Register For Our Mailing List

Register to receive our free weekly newsletter including editorials.

Home / 384

11 key findings on retirement dreams during the pandemic

COVID-19 is taking a harsh toll on the economic wellbeing of many retirees with research showing it has shaken their confidence in the quality of their retirement and how long their money will last. Notwithstanding the recovery in many share prices over recent months, returns on cash and term deposits are negligible.

Here are 11 key findings from the Allianz Retire+ research during the pandemic, conducted a few months ago. A more comprehensive summary of the research follows the list.

1. Money is a recurring worry for retirees

Almost one in four retirees (24% of survey respondents) said they worried about making ends meet. One in five (20%) said money was a constant worry.

2. Spending even less on necessities, luxuries

Three quarters (75%) of surveyed retirees said they were spending less on luxuries due to COVID-19. Two thirds (68%) of retirees said they were only buying necessities.

3. Many retirees did not feel financially secure

Half (51%) of surveyed retirees said they did not feel secure in their financial position.

4. Wealth destruction

A third (36%) of surveyed retirees said they had lost money during the COVID-19 market downturn. One in 10 (13%) believed they had experienced financial losses that would not be recovered during their retirement.

5. Vulnerable to another financial shock

Almost two-thirds of respondents (61%) did not believe their financial situation was safe in the event of another economic downturn.

6. Lack of control

Just under half of surveyed retirees (45%) did not feel in control of their financial future. Higher sharemarket volatility was making many retirees feel they were at the mercy of global financial markets and unable to control their financial future.

7. Quality of life worries

Recurring worries about day-to-day bills, financial security and the risk of another economic shock was fuelling concerns about life quality in retirement. A third (34%) of retirees said they worried about whether their finances would allow them to have a good quality of life.

8. Illness, market uncertainty top concerns

The top five retiree concerns were:

*becoming ill (55%)

*unexpected costs (45%)

* losing a loved one (44%)

* not having enough money to live the life they wanted in retirement (34%)

* the risk of one-off market downturns such as COVID-19 and the GFC (32%).

9. More conservative approach

Almost two-thirds (62%) of surveyed retirees said they were taking a more conservative approach to their retirement because of COVID-19. Given that many retirees already live conservatively, the finding added to the broader survey theme of retirees cutting back even further and taking fewer financial risks during the pandemic.

10. Retirement expectations being downgraded

Almost a quarter of current retirees (23%) now had more negative expectations of their retirement due to COVID-19.

11. Wary of financial advice

Less than a quarter (23%) of surveyed respondents sought financial advice, even though they were feeling less financially secure. Allianz Retire+ research consistently finds that retirees who used professional investment advice feel more confident in their financial position.

Here is more detail on the research:

Shortcomings in retirement outcomes

Many Australian retirees are downgrading their retirement expectations, spending less on luxuries, and are fearful and confused about the safety of their investments.

The Allianz Retire+ survey collated the views of over 1,000 current and prospective retirees nationwide in May 2020, to understand how COVID-19 was affecting their lifestyle, investment actions and retirement perceptions.

Only one-third of retirees feel confident in their financial position. In addition to health concerns about the virus and not being able to see family and friends as much, retirees are yet again suffering the sharemarket rollercoaster.

A total of 66% do not agree that Australia’s superannuation system will provide them with a dignified retirement. It suggests the Australian superannuation system, which is lauded as one of the best globally, is not working for a great deal of the people it’s designed for.

Moreover, COVID-19’s impact has exposed systemic issues in the drawdown phase of retirement, highlighting shortcomings in retirement product design, access to financial advice and superannuation education.

In a previous study, ‘The Next Chapter’ undertaken by Allianz Retire+ in 2019, retirees reported feeling nervous and uncertain about what’s ahead and lacked in investing confidence. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has taken that to a new level. On both occasions the research indicated retirees want safe, simple, low-cost retirement products with certainty a key feature. Unfortunately, the investment industry is not generally meeting that need.

The current survey found that three in four retirees are not confident about how long their money will last in retirement and when asked about their investments during the pandemic, only 18% felt their investments would be safe in case of economic downturn. They also reported being largely risk averse, seemingly exacerbated by the pandemic.

Source: Allianz Retire+, ‘Black Swan Research’, May 2020

Nearly half of respondents said they were monitoring their investments much closer due to COVID-19 and just under a third of those surveyed were happy with the federal government’s response to COVID-19 policies that affect their retirement.

The pandemic has brought many of the systemic issues back to the surface and there needs to be a greater sense of urgency in delivering change to the system. 

Prospective retirees most at risk

The economic impact of COVID-19 was greater on prospective retirees (within seven years to retirement) than current retirees, the survey found.

Source: Allianz Retire+, ‘Black Swan Research’, May 2020

Vulnerability close to retirement

About 40% of prospective retirees said they lost money to date during COVID-19. Just over one in five said their employment status has (or may) change due to the economic downturn.

Falling retirement savings and rising job insecurity is a toxic combination. Around one in three prospective retirees now have more negative expectations of their retirement. And 77% of prospective retirees do not believe superannuation will provide them with enough money in retirement.

Those nearing retirement have been particularly hurt by the downturn. These investors tend to have more funds allocated to shares, so have higher susceptibility to market crashes. Typically, they are still working and need that income to build retirement savings.

This is where the impact of COVID-19 has shown the danger of ‘sequencing risk’, where the timing of poor market returns can permanently damage retirement savings. Prospective retiree investors can ill afford to have the share component of their superannuation crushed by market volatility. Many do not have enough time left in the workforce to rebuild their wealth.

With COVID-19 reinforcing the need for retirement-savings products that have a low-cost protection mechanism, around one in three prospective retirees said they would consider an investment product that ‘insured them from market downturns’. Investing in retirement is very different to accumulation and retirees are realising diversification and asset allocation is no panacea to protect wealth during crises. 

Lack of advice during the pandemic

Remarkably, the survey found 79% of retirees did not seek financial advice during COVID-19.

Only one in five retirees felt that they had easy access to professional financial advice and approximately a third felt financial advisers were ‘for the rich’. Almost two-thirds of those without an adviser said they would not use one because the service was too costly.

The advice proposition is proven to be an integral part of providing individuals with confidence and certainty in retirement, with those who use an adviser stating more confidence and security in their financial position. And 68% of those who were advised during COVID-19 said they are sticking to their financial plan, meaning advice is definitely deterring people from making sub-optimal investment decisions based on fear or a lack of understanding. That fact alone proves there is a clear need to change the perception of financial advice among retirees and increase access to affordable advice.

About the survey

Allianz Retire+ commissioned research surveying 1,007 retirees in May 2020 to understand how the economic impact of COVID-19 was affecting them. The sample was split equally between current and prospective (retiring in the next seven years) retirees, and equally between men and women. Most respondents were aged 60 to 75 or over. The survey included responses from retirees in each State and Territory. About two thirds of respondents had an annual household income below $79,000.

Innovative retirement income products with in-built protection from sharemarket losses include Future Safe from Allianz Retire +.

Matt Rady is Chief Executive Officer of Allianz Retire+. This material is for general information purposes only. It is not comprehensive or intended to give financial product advice and does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs.

 

8 Comments
Drew
November 25, 2020

'Only one-third of retirees feel confident in their financial position'
Sounds like the 23% in the survey that are seeking financial advice and got themselves a shoulder to lean on
Linked ? I think so !!!!

Greg
November 24, 2020

It is logical for a low risk, conservative retiree to underspend.

There is a 10% chance one of a couple lives to the age of close to 100. Accordingly, 90% of us will depart before that;

As others point out, we don't know in advance whether we are a long-lifer or a shorter-lifer (or whether we will have a medically cheap or medically expensive departure) and, by necessity, we all (generalisation) do our financial planning on the assumption we might be one of the 10% long-lifers.

End result, the majority, making up the 90%, underspend when they die early.

The other option is, I guess, to deliberately spend everything and deliberately go to full pension - not convinced that is good for anyone.

Leslie Hams
November 24, 2020

I think it is quite understandable that retirees with limited funds are very wary of using financial advisors in view of the recent inquiries into the industry. A lot of previously considered highly ethical and trustworthy advisers were far from it.

Tuan Packeer
November 25, 2020

I agree with you. The economic downturn has had a huge impact on my Pension account that I set up with a well known fund manager.I went with them primarily for their promised ethical approach to management of retiree income, however it turns out that the dedicated financial adviser missed the boat completely and it was too late to stop trading as the stock market had already dived down. So where was my expert advise and what was the use of the fees etc that I pay for their expertise? Is the government looking at regulating this business and putting some hard legislation in place for us retirees that want to protect the nest egg?

Dudley.
November 22, 2020

All problems of a define contribution retirement system = too many known unknowns resulting in in-computability resulting in negligible spending - exacerbated by negligible returns.

A defined benefit retirement system = someone else's problem = don't want to know unknowns.

Anton
November 22, 2020

We are not spending money as we dont know how long we might live and so how much money we might need overall. Also the last few years of ones life can be very expensive with maybe needing special needs accommodation (a room in a decent aged care facility will cost you around $1 million, so you need to have funds of $2 million for yourself and wife/husband if you will need to go into special aged care). In addition are normal aged health issues which can result in expensive treatments. Unfortunately relying on the government health system can mean many years of waiting for your op/treatment.
With the economic worry about what might happen to ones investments its only natural that many people only send what they really have to.

Leigh atkinson
November 21, 2020

Absolutely agree

Janice
November 21, 2020

The Retirement Income review just published suggests the vast majority of wealth is held throughout retirement until death and passed to the children. Seems the main problem is people not spending enough, not running out of money.

 

Leave a Comment:

     

RELATED ARTICLES

Retirement dreams face virus setback

Risk in retirement: five strategies for finding the right balance

How decumulation in retirement differs from accumulation

banner

Most viewed in recent weeks

10 reasons wealthy homeowners shouldn't receive welfare

The RBA Governor says rising house prices are due to "the design of our taxation and social security systems". The OECD says "the prolonged boom in house prices has inflated the wealth of many pensioners without impacting their pension eligibility." What's your view?

Three all-time best tables for every adviser and investor

It's a remarkable statistic. In any year since 1875, if you had invested in the Australian stock index, turned away and come back eight years later, your average return would be 120% with no negative periods.

The looming excess of housing and why prices will fall

Never stand between Australian households and an uncapped government programme with $3 billion in ‘free money’ to build or renovate their homes. But excess supply is coming with an absence of net migration.

Five stocks that have worked well in our portfolios

Picking macro trends is difficult. What may seem logical and compelling one minute may completely change a few months later. There are better rewards from focussing on identifying the best companies at good prices.

Survey responses on pension eligibility for wealthy homeowners

The survey drew a fantastic 2,000 responses with over 1,000 comments and polar opposite views on what is good policy. Do most people believe the home should be in the age pension asset test, and what do they say?

Let's make this clear again ... franking credits are fair

Critics of franking credits are missing the main point. The taxable income of shareholders/taxpayers must also include the company tax previously paid to the ATO before the dividend was distributed. It is fair.

Latest Updates

Investment strategies

Joe Hockey on the big investment influences on Australia

Former Treasurer Joe Hockey became Australia's Ambassador to the US and he now runs an office in Washington, giving him a unique perspective on geopolitical issues. They have never been so important for investors.

Investment strategies

The tipping point for investing in decarbonisation

Throughout time, transformative technology has changed the course of human history, but it is easy to be lulled into believing new technology will also transform investment returns. Where's the tipping point?

Exchange traded products

The options to gain equity exposure with less risk

Equity investing pays off over long terms but comes with risks in the short term that many people cannot tolerate, especially retirees preserving capital. There are ways to invest in stocks with little downside.

Exchange traded products

8 ways LIC bonus options can benefit investors

Bonus options issued by Listed Investment Companies (LICs) deliver many advantages but there is a potential dilutionary impact if options are exercised well below the share price. This must be factored in.

Retirement

Survey responses on pension eligibility for wealthy homeowners

The survey drew a fantastic 2,000 responses with over 1,000 comments and polar opposite views on what is good policy. Do most people believe the home should be in the age pension asset test, and what do they say?

Investment strategies

Three demographic themes shaping investments for the future

Focussing on companies that will benefit from slow moving, long duration and highly predictable demographic trends can help investors predict future opportunities. Three main themes stand out.

Fixed interest

It's not high return/risk equities versus low return/risk bonds

High-yield bonds carry more risk than investment grade but they offer higher income returns. An allocation to high-yield bonds in a portfolio - alongside equities and other bonds – is worth considering.

Sponsors

Alliances

© 2021 Morningstar, Inc. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer
The data, research and opinions provided here are for information purposes; are not an offer to buy or sell a security; and are not warranted to be correct, complete or accurate. Morningstar, its affiliates, and third-party content providers are not responsible for any investment decisions, damages or losses resulting from, or related to, the data and analyses or their use. Any general advice or ‘regulated financial advice’ under New Zealand law has been prepared by Morningstar Australasia Pty Ltd (ABN: 95 090 665 544, AFSL: 240892) and/or Morningstar Research Ltd, subsidiaries of Morningstar, Inc, without reference to your objectives, financial situation or needs. For more information refer to our Financial Services Guide (AU) and Financial Advice Provider Disclosure Statement (NZ). You should consider the advice in light of these matters and if applicable, the relevant Product Disclosure Statement before making any decision to invest. Past performance does not necessarily indicate a financial product’s future performance. To obtain advice tailored to your situation, contact a professional financial adviser. Articles are current as at date of publication.
This website contains information and opinions provided by third parties. Inclusion of this information does not necessarily represent Morningstar’s positions, strategies or opinions and should not be considered an endorsement by Morningstar.

Website Development by Master Publisher.