Editorial Guidelines for Writers

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Cuffelinks focusses on content with enduring quality to assist investors to understand products and construct portfolios. We prefer articles on long-term themes which will stand the test of time through investment cycles, written for a predominantly Australian audience.

The finance world is littered with newsletters and websites giving stock selections and market predictions, often contradicting each other, and subject to constant reframing as the next bit of unexpected news hits the market. We prefer enduring insights.

Cuffelinks does not focus on breaking news, executive appointments, short-term macro forecasts or global political events which are often little more than noise and guesswork. We are not short-term stock pickers, other than in the context of illustrating particular portfolio ideas, and we do not republish media releases.

Education not promotion

We want fresh ideas, quality journalism, well-researched opinions and accurate arguments. You are welcome to comment on existing articles, or contribute an original piece. You should be an expert in your subject as we do not accept submissions from students or people promoting their own blog or services.

Contributions should not be written in highly technical language. Articles must be predominantly educational and not promoting or advertising a specific product. However, they may take a view on a type of structure, security or product which may have specific or general application, and examples are acceptable if we do not consider the context overly-promotional.

Articles must be original content not widely-published previously. We accept the content may already have appeared on the author’s own website and distributed to their own clients, but not in other commercial and public newsletters.

Articles must be relevant to readers who are not market professionals, but are engaged in managing their investments and have a good understanding of markets.

What are our requirements?

Articles should be around 1,000 words, with a maximum of about 1,250. Longer pieces will be considered where the type of article demands it. Please write in Microsoft Word, without columns or complex formatting. Contributors should avoid footnotes, little-known acronyms, financial jargon, academic references or articles which are similar to other pieces already published on our website. Generally, contributions should target an Australian reader and be accurate for Australian law and regulations. Download our Style Guide here.

Contributors may hold securities or investments that they mention in their articles but this should be acknowledged at the end of the article.

Cuffelinks does not necessarily endorse or agree with the opinions or recommendations that we publish. The writer or an organisation will be listed on every article.

Articles may be edited for length and style. We do not publish long disclaimers at the end of articles because it adds unnecessary length to our newsletter, and all readers and authors are subject to these Terms and Conditions which do not need repeating in each article.

Contributors warrant that their work is original, other than any acknowledgements in the text, and it does not defame anyone or breach copyright. Please see our Community Rules Policy on acceptable standards to avoid offensive or inappropriate material.

How do we thank you?

Cuffelinks is a community of investors sharing ideas, and we offer an outlet for experienced writers to air their opinions. We do not pay for contributions. To encourage a wide readership and to ensure our independence, we do not charge readers a subscription fee nor collect product-related fees.

In addition to having their opinion reach a wide audience of engaged readers, we write a brief note about each author at the end of the article and provide a link to a business website.

Cuffelinks has an unlimited right to publish and republish any articles, including selling the content. To a limited extent and not systematically, articles may be reproduced elsewhere but Cuffelinks must be attributed with first publication with the author and their company identified.

Not licenced to provide personal financial advice

Articles may contain general financial product information, but Cuffelinks Pty Ltd is a publishing service and does not hold an Australian Financial Services Licence. We are not authorised to provide personal financial advice. Cuffelinks Pty Ltd accepts no liability for any actions taken by Contributors or readers as a result of material published on our web site or contained in the related newsletter. Readers should be aware that investments mentioned in any articles may not be suitable for them, and may be subject to a variety of market risks. Cuffelinks is not attempting to influence the sale or purchase of any securities, and all readers should obtain personal independent financial advice.

 

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