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Video: Noel Whittaker on investing until you’re 100

At any point in time, regardless of the existence of a severe event like COVID-19, the outlook is always unclear and range of outcomes uncertain. Rather than speculate about markets, it’s better to stay the course with a diversified portfolio based on your attitude to risk. Author and personal finance expert Noel Whittaker talks with Graham Hand.

From the Morningstar Individual Investor Conference, 30 October 2020


The Morningstar 2020 Individual Investor Conference was held over 29 and 30 October and drew over 2,000 registrations. It offered investors the opportunity to tap into the expertise and knowledge and Australia's leading investors. 

Some of the highlight sessions include:

  • Hamish Douglass from Magellan discusses the US election, long-term trends and your portfolio.
  • Gemma Dale from nabtrade on the rise of the retail investor
  • Kate Howitt on how she identifies attractive companies
  • David Harrison from Charter Hall Property discusses how it's all about location, location and ... strategy.
  • Anton Tagliaferro of IML on finding long-term opportunities in the current market.

Get access to all the recordings and explore all Premium benefits with a free Morningstar Premium trial. No credit card required.


Noel Whittaker is one of the world’s foremost authorities on personal finance and an international bestselling author. His latest book, Retirement Made Simple, is available at www.noelwhittaker.com.au

 

6 Comments
ABC
November 09, 2020

I agree completely with CC.
Also, once you have about $100,000 in a super fund, why not create your own index fund? Just invest in the largest 10 or 12 Aussie shares, weighted by market capitalisation. Adjust a couple of times a year and the results will be close enough to the index. I started doing this in 1993 and it works with little effort. After their fees and other costs, I beat most super fund managers most years and often beat them all.

Geoff
November 15, 2020

Simply invest in Argo Investments (ARG) and/or Australian Foundation Investment (AFI).

Trevor
November 08, 2020

VERY STRONG HINT.....because I am not "licensed to give financial advice".........there are management strategies available.... . BUY NOEL'S BOOK !

AlanB
November 05, 2020

28:28 "...and watch that they don't charge too much in fees. .... a 1% $40,000 fee on a $4m share portfolio is ridiculous." It would be interesting to know the % increase in wealth to a client from using a financial planner/advisor, compared to the % increase in wealth to the financial planner/advisor from using a client. 

Geoff
November 05, 2020

37:30 in the video, re. paying your financial advisor. It's not a good question as the answer surely depends upon what said advisor is doing for you. If they're providing investment advice and managing your portfolio, then a % of FUM is reasonable - so long as it's a reasonable %. If they're giving you advice on this or that particular topic - say estate planning, financing into a retirement home, general investment strategy when not in control of particular assets, then a $/hr charge seems more appropriate.

What I have a huge problem with is this insistence on % of FUM when the advisor essentially does absolutely nothing active but review your portfolio once a year. Nice work if you can get it.

My partner got into a conversation with FPs about transferring her UK pension assets to Australia, and I was gobsmacked that there was a 1%-ish fee for organising the transfer, and an ongoing 1% on FUM for "advice" because the vehicle into which the funds (being superannuation) required a FP to operate it - ie. make any changes. Given the amount in question was some $600K or thereabouts, that seemed like theft to me. The cost to transfer assets is independent of the size of the assets, and the cost of making changes to the investments is as well. She didn't proceed for reasons other than the fees, but it all just seemed like money for jam for the FP firm involved to me.

CC
November 08, 2020

You'd do much better to manage your shares and managed funds by yourself, as I do. it's really not that hard. particularly these days with low fee ETFs, index funds, etc.

 

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