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Edition: 156

1-7 out of 7 results.

Retrospectivity ain’t what it used to be

In recent months, both sides of politics have explained what they mean by 'retrospective' changes to policy, and their new superannuation rules fall into their own definitions.

Workers reaching 60 face super shock

Among the Budget's proposed super changes, little has been said about the broad impact of the new transition to retirement rules. Those who intend working beyond the age of 60 may now pay tax on their entire balance.

SMSF assets will not need segregating

SMSFs transferring funds to a tax-free pension account under the proposed cap of $1.6 million will not need to sell or segregate assets from an accumulation account for the same member.

Zip your wallet against economic forecasts

Given how difficult it is to forecast statistics such as GDP, employment or inflation, investors should ignore macroeconomics. Even if forecasts were accurate, they are not very useful for valuing shares.

Fear factor should start the hunting season

The current level of fear in the market could be signalling a downturn or even another GFC. Investors should remember the lessons from the last crisis, and be in a position to take advantage of the next one.

The value of wealth management for Australian banks

The wealth management businesses of major banks may be efficient uses of their capital, but it comes with scrutiny of the vertical integration model and culture risks. There's increasing focus on whether it's worth having.

Rules can change, but the final score still matters most

Although the proposed changes to superannuation might be worryingly detrimental to retirement outcomes, super will remain the most tax-effective retirement saving vehicle for the majority of people.

Most viewed in recent weeks

Coronavirus and a roadmap for infected investing

As much as value investors with spare cash want to jump on undervalued companies, it's probably not the time to buy the dip in the market just yet as the US braces for coronavirus's full impact.

Why we’re not buying the market yet

The Australian market bounced back last Friday (13th) and Monday (16th) tempting analysts to call the bottom of the coronavirus scare. This is too early as the impact on companies is not yet evident.

Douglass on coronavirus: 'Expect volatility but don't panic'

As investors hit the panic button, Magellan's Hamish Douglass is staying his course, advising attendees at last week's Investor Evening to sit tight and take a long-term view.

Drawdown reductions needed for retirees - UPDATED POLICY

During the GFC, in the face of rapid falls in super balances, the minimum drawdowns required for pensions were reduced by 50% to help preserve overall retirement savings. It's time for a repeat.

What are the possible economic effects of COVID-19 on the world economy?

In a widely-quoted scenario using estimated attack and fatality rates of coronavirus, about 0.07% of the population of the US dies. That's about 230,000 people, which the market is not ready for.

5 lessons from the GFC as panic whips hybrids

For investors able to react quickly when stressed selling hits hybrids, excellent margins are available on quality names. The GFC taught experienced investors lessons that are now repeating.

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