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Edition: 336

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Fund giant feels heat in ETF fee war

State Street Global Advisors is a pioneer in the Australian ETF market, but aggressive pricing from new rivals has eroded its competitive edge.

Millennials struggle to invest, but property top priority

The investment industry is looking for the best ways to engage with millennials. While younger people want to invest, they are either saving for a home or cannot afford to invest at the moment. 

Four major insights from APRA’s super heatmap

Check your fund on the heatmap. Many super trustees must decide whether to stick with their strategies or accept that APRA will take a tough approach to weeding out underperformers with high fees.

Checking the temperature of the APRA heatmap

The APRA MySuper heatmap uses a consistent methodology, and some funds come out badly. How will members and trustees react, and should APRA have sorted out the problems privately? 

Australian ETFs further widen their appeal

ETFs continue to increase strongly, especially in the fixed income category, with younger people and advisers among the major growth categories. Within a year, assets could hit $75 billion. 

A decade of Aussie shares: who delivered, who dithered?

Following the uncertainty of the GFC, 2010 to 2019 delivered decent Australian share results overall, with wide variations by sector. It's fascinating to see who won and lost over the decade.

Have bonds reached the end of the line?

Some investors are questioning the role of bonds with such low rates, but they remain an important part of a diversified portfolio for several reasons. Don't give up on them yet.

How to sell business real property into an SMSF

From 1 July 2018, new provisions affect SMSF members putting business real property into their SMSF, including making future contributions. But it's not the end of this popular strategy.

The role of retirement villages in retiree housing

The majority of Australians prefer to ‘age in place’, and legislation on retirement villages is complex. They are increasingly popular but understanding the options is not for the faint-hearted.

Welcome to Firstlinks Edition 336

  • 11 December 2019

The irony of the focus on longevity and the retiree fear of money running out is that most people leave more assets to their estate than they held when they entered retirement. If it's possible to look from beyond the grave, it must be frustrating to have worked hard and saved, then lived a frugal retirement, only to see the following generations fritter the money away.

Most viewed in recent weeks

10 reasons wealthy homeowners shouldn't receive welfare

The RBA Governor says rising house prices are due to "the design of our taxation and social security systems". The OECD says "the prolonged boom in house prices has inflated the wealth of many pensioners without impacting their pension eligibility." What's your view?

Three all-time best tables for every adviser and investor

It's a remarkable statistic. In any year since 1875, if you had invested in the Australian stock index, turned away and come back eight years later, your average return would be 120% with no negative periods.

The looming excess of housing and why prices will fall

Never stand between Australian households and an uncapped government programme with $3 billion in ‘free money’ to build or renovate their homes. But excess supply is coming with an absence of net migration.

Five stocks that have worked well in our portfolios

Picking macro trends is difficult. What may seem logical and compelling one minute may completely change a few months later. There are better rewards from focussing on identifying the best companies at good prices.

Let's make this clear again ... franking credits are fair

Critics of franking credits are missing the main point. The taxable income of shareholders/taxpayers must also include the company tax previously paid to the ATO before the dividend was distributed. It is fair.

Welcome to Firstlinks Edition 424 with weekend update

Wet streets cause rain. The Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect is a name created by writer Michael Crichton after he realised that everything he read or heard in the media was wrong when he had direct personal knowledge or expertise on the subject. He surmised that everything else is probably wrong as well, and financial markets are no exception.

  • 9 September 2021

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