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Why hybrids win from the election result

The threat of Labor denying franking credit refunds led some investors to sell hybrids, widening their margins, which created investment opportunities for those willing to look past the immediate announcement.

Franking credits lament: was it worth it?

Labor justified its franking credits policy based on the cost rising 10-fold since 2001 and heading towards unaffordable levels. But were the numbers right and would the savings ever have eventuated?

Franking policy may increase corporate tax avoidance

The results of three studies suggest that companies undertake less tax avoidance due to franking credit refundability. It gives an incentive to pay corporate tax and franked dividends to satisfy Australian shareholders.

Two Labor policies facing inadequate scrutiny

The assumption that being a member of a large pooled fund will protect franking credit refunds, and the lack of concern about the impact of Labor's capital gains tax change, both require greater scrutiny.

7 strategies to manage a loss of franking

Much has been written about Labor's franking policy, so we bring together a range of possible strategies. It's likely that even if implemented, it will not be in its current guise, so anyone affected should wait before taking action.

A fair go in favour of Labor’s franking policy

Cuffelinks has received over a thousand comments on Labor's franking credit proposal. Here is a selection in favour of the policy to balance the generally critical nature of most comments and articles on the policy.

No logic in reinstating the complex 10% rule

In the final Leaders' Debate, the Prime Minister asked why Labor wishes to deny a tax deduction for additional personal concessional contributions, reinstating the old 10% rule. What's the logic of this complex rule?

Frank(ing) exchange with Bowen: "Is it fair?"

Labor's franking credit proposal will reduce the income of many retirees who do not believe they are wealthy. Here's an exchange with a reader who just wants an answer to "Is it fair?"

Labor’s $3,000 cap on managing tax affairs

Labor is proposing to cap at $3,000 the amount that can be claimed as a tax deduction for managing tax affairs. There are many circumstances where taxpayers need to spend more than this.

Compare the pair: Coalition v Labor super

Rarely do we go into an election with such contrasting policies from the major parties, and no more so than in superannuation. The nation's decision on 18 May will have a big impact on retirement savings.

Steps SMSFs may take to beat Labor’s franking

If Labor legislates to withdraw franking credit refunds, retirees have an alternative for their pension superannuation to retain the refund. It shows the proposal does not have 'horizontal equity' between structures.

Labor policies and the impact on housing

Labor's proposed policies on negative gearing and capital gains may come at a time when residential property is already weak, and it's unlikely to make buying a property easier for first-home buyers.

Most viewed in recent weeks

Most investors are wrong on dividend yield as income

The current yield on a share or trust is simply the latest dividend divided by the current share price, an abstract number at a point in time. What really matters is the income delivered in the long run.

My 10 biggest investment management lessons

A Chris Cuffe classic article that never ages. Every experienced investor develops a set of beliefs about how markets operate.

Magellan’s Vihari Ross on the players in the team

The companies that earn a place in an investment portfolio are like the players in a sporting team. They must perform strongly and complement each other, and not keep someone out who is better.

Lessons from the Future Fund for retail investors

The Annual Report from Australia's sovereign wealth fund reveals new ways it is investing in fixed income and alternatives. The Fund considers its portfolio as one overall risk position with downside protection in one asset class allowing more risk in another.

What do negative rates and other RBA moves mean for investors?

The RBA is likely to first exhaust conventional easing by cutting the cash rate to 0.5% by year end before deploying unconventional measures. Negative interest rates are unlikely.

Four companies riding the healthcare boom

There are strong demographic trends in ageing and consumer spending and investing in the right healthcare companies can ride this wave as well as produce better health outcomes for people. 

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